Sunday, December 8, 2013

A Skeleton Key

(photo courtesy of psdgraphics.com)
There’s always someone to blame; the lover that tore your heart from your soul, the fool who assaulted you, the teacher who said you’d never amount to anything, the kids who called you fat, the director who would never cast you in a leading role, the co-workers who mock your singing, the parent who was too overbearing or the one who didn’t care at all.

And of course, the there are always folks to point back to at pivotal points in our lives, the ones who made a positive difference; the teacher that pointed you out as a leader, the ones who saw potential in you, the parent who gave all they had to help you succeed, the friends who stuck with you through thick and thin, the lover that still loves you – faults and all, the friends who chime in with your singing - harmonizing to cover for you when you fall off key.

There are many people who have come and gone in our lives, they’ve all shaped us in one way or another. Some have shown us the evil side of everything living, others who have lifted us up when we were lying at rock bottom, those who walk beside us, and those who step on us when we’re down.

We love to revel in the joy our friends draw out of us, and we often blame our failures on those who came across our path with nothing good in their hearts.

We can harbor hatred and become more bitter with each passing day, focusing on everything negative. Or we can let go of our anger and let the enemy of our soul choke on it, focusing on all we have to be thankful for. We can approach every rock in our path as a stumbling block or a stepping stone. Certainly some are harder to get around than others, I’ve climbed a few boulders, myself. No one says this is easy.

But on behalf of those whose heart-breaking actions were unintentional and those blind to the pain they were causing at the time, I offer this olive branch, a skeleton key that opens very old doors:

“In the past I may not have loved you like I should have
I may not have loved you like you needed to be loved
I may not have poured into your life the things you wanted from me
            But, please, forgive me and let me love you now”

From those whose intent was plain evil, I have no words, but forgiveness is the same key to unlock your freedom from the hold they still have over you.

We can seek healing – or excuses, but not both. We can forgive and move forward, or point blame and wallow in our anguish. No one from our past can make that choice for us.

Enter the holidays (and the rest of your life) with joy and thanksgiving by letting go of a past that can’t be changed and embracing the future where we write the words on each page.

“…Go in peace. Your journey has the LORD’S approval.” –Judges 18:6 (NIV)

“No discipline [today’s example, the discipline of forgiveness] seems pleasant at the time, but painful. Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.” – Hebrews 12:11 (NIV)
(Words in bracket are mine.)

“For, whoever would love life and see good days must keep their tongue from evil and their lips from deceitful speech. They must turn from evil and do good; they must seek peace and pursue it. For theeyes of the Lord are on the righteous and his ears are attentive to their prayer, but the face of the Lord is against those who do evil.” – 1 Peter 3:10-12 (NIV)

“Mercy, peace and love be yours in abundance.” – Jude 1:2 (NIV)


Wednesday, December 4, 2013

The Hammer - My Christmas Story For You

The Hammer
by Helen Williams!
Since Mary and Joseph had been turned away from all the inns and told they could stay in a barn and that their child could sleep in the newly made manger when he was born, that’s where they found themselves the next morning. Their child had been born late in the night, a boy child. They named him Jesus. He lay quietly on a bed of hay in the manger. As Mary sat there watching him sleep, she couldn’t help but notice what a beautiful manger it was. Considering it was built to hold hay for the cows, she wondered why its maker took such care and put so much delicate work into it. Her husband, being a carpenter, might know. She called it to his attention and asked him why he thought the carpenter that built it would have made it so ornate.

‘Well, either he just takes a lot of pride in his work, no matter what he’s making, or he had nothing much else to do and decided to put all that detail there to keep himself busy. Or perhaps God told him that our child – His child, would lay there. Only the carpenter himself knows. And yes, he did a wonderful job on it. But we’ll probably never know who made it, dear.’

As he was answering Mary some straw from the hayloft sifted through the boards and they heard a rustling coming from above.

‘But then again,’ he whispered, ‘one never knows.’

He tiptoed around to the steps that led to the hayloft and as quietly as he could, climbed them. When he got to the top he boldly asked, ‘Who’s up here?’
He waited for an answer. At first there was silence. But when he saw the straw moving, he asked, ‘Shall I come see for myself?’

At that, the straw moved a lot and from it emerged an old man. He tried to stand, but lost his footing and sat down.

‘Hello, master. It is only I, the keeper of the animals. I mean you no harm. I sleep here alone. I’ll be on my way about with my chores now.’

He got up and hobbled to the top of the steps as Joseph descended. He came down slowly. By the time he reached the last step, Mary eagerly asked him if he knew who had made the beautiful manger.

He nodded his head. ‘It was I, ma’am.’

Mary noticed that even though he was on the ground now, he didn’t stand up straight. She complimented the craftsmanship he’d so skillfully used on the manger but had to ask, ‘Why did you make it so special? A manger is for animals to eat from. You made it look like a piece of furniture for a king’s house.’

‘Ah yes, ma’am. I did make furniture for the king’s palace, and he did like it to be perfect. I can still work as well as I used to, even though I’m all bent over now. So my work carries on. Though the only job I could get was here. You see ma’am, once you’ve worked for the king and been let go, no one wants you. I’m a reproach among men and they don’t even know why. The king didn’t like the way I look. When I was young and strong looking they liked to have me as the king’s carpenter. But as I’ve aged, time has not been so kind to me. The longer I live, the more bent over I stay. When the king dismissed me no one would even look at me. I felt as though he’d spit on me. All I managed to bring with me was that big ol’ hammer there.’

He pointed it out. ‘So now, you must know that God’s hand is upon me for me to make such a craft using such a big hammer. The other tools I use, I’ve made myself. They too are meager, but that big hammer was once in the king’s carpenter shop. I guess it’s rather special to me. I worked there a long time.’

As he rambled on, he came nearer to the baby and was straining his neck to see him. Joseph sat down behind Mary, putting his hand on her shoulder. They both smiled at the man. Mary asked, ‘Would you like to see our baby? Come closer. He seems to have awakened by your voice, but he’ll not cry.’

‘Why, his eyes are opened and he’s just a newborn. I’ve never seen the likes of him,’ he chuckled. ‘It looks as though he’s looking right up at me, almost as if he knows me. Cute little boy. What did you name him?’

Joseph spoke up, ‘His name is Jesus. Come closer. Would you like to hold him?’

‘Oh, you can’t trust my back. I don’t think I should.’ But there was a look of yearning in his eyes.

‘God’s hand is upon you, remember? You said so yourself. Pick him up and hold him close,’ Mary said.

The old man came closer and bent over to pick him up, praying he’d be able to hold the boy Jesus. As he stood up, he kept straightening himself to a standing position. At first he didn’t even realize he stood up straight, as he did in his youth. He smiled at the child and talked to him ever so quietly. He looked at Mary and said, ‘If I didn’t know better, I’d think he was trying to tell me that he knows me. Just the wishing of an old man…’ His voice trailed off.
(photo from harrolds.blogspot.com)
Suddenly realizing he was standing tall, he exclaimed, ‘Why, little Jesus, if you could see me now! I’m standing again! It’s a miracle!’

He held the baby close to himself and began to dance around the room. Joseph smiled at Mary and she said, ‘It’s not the first one to happen in this barn.’

After returning the baby to the manger, the man said, ‘I’m blessed by the hand of God, indeed. I can’t repay God for the miracle He’s done in my life, but I do want you to take my hammer with you when you go. I want you to teach this young child to be a good carpenter. As he grows, show him how to bring life to something as simple as a piece of wood. And tell him about me when he’s older. And tell him about the manger. And, I wish I could tell him myself. If you were going to be around for a while, I’d make him something to take with him, from me. But I’m sure you’ll be moving on shortly here. So take the hammer, please. The hammer reminded me of when I worked for the king. But my walk will remind everyone that I walk for the king, now.'

His eyes gleamed with joy and delight.

Joseph accepted the hammer from the old man and promised that it would be Jesus’ to use as he grew, knowing that he’d have to be quite a little man to swing that hammer. It was a big one, indeed.

When Jesus was big enough to swing the hammer, the first thing he made was a manger for his donkey to eat from. He took time and care and lovingly made it after the pattern his mother had described so many times. When he’d completed his work, he called his mother to see it. He led her by the hand into the workshop where he and his father worked so diligently. She was proud of his work and her eyes filled with tears.

Jesus said, ‘Mother, if my donkey can come into the house, we can keep it there! It does look beautiful enough for a king’s house, doesn’t it?’
(photo from thebiblicalworld.blogspot.com)
It sure does, my son. But the donkey stays outside. We’ll keep the manger forever. It will remind us how our heavenly Father wants us humbled before Him, so He can lift us up with His blessings. The manger you laid in was truly a blessing, to me, as well as to the old man. I wanted you to have the best, but God wanted you to be born in a barn. But in the midst of that barn, He let us know that He was there with us. Oh my Jesus, I love you.’ She hugged him tight.

As Jesus grew older, he grew in the wisdom of God and in love. He always showed his love, never esteeming himself more highly than others. He knew that it was better to give than to receive and he knew that he would give the ultimate display of love at the appointed time. He knew that when you lend, expect not to receive back what you’ve lent. And he always gave his best, which is why when a city boy came out to where Jesus lived, looking for the biggest and heaviest hammer he could find, Jesus gave him his.

The boy told him, ‘My father is the biggest man in the city and he has a big job to do. I told him that I would find just the right hammer for the job and I’ll keep looking until I do.’

Jesus stopped him and said, ‘Why did you promise to find this special hammer for your father?’

‘Wouldn’t you?’ the boy replied. ‘Besides,’ he added with a whisper, ‘if I do bring home the perfect hammer, he won’t send my mother and me away.’

Jesus told him, ‘Well, you’ll need a little help to carry my hammer. It’s very big; just right for that big job. I’ll help you carry it.’

They walked together for almost a mile. Pointing, the boy announced, ‘There’s my father. We live over there. He will be pleased. Would you like to meet him? Come on.’
The boy ran ahead of Jesus, calling to his father. Looking up, he saw them coming.
‘I’ve found the biggest and best hammer for you, Father!’

His father looked at Jesus and furrowed his brow. ‘Do I know you? You look so familiar. Your look says you know me.’
‘No,’ Jesus replied, ‘you don’t know me yet.’
He handed him the hammer and shook his other hand. After Jesus turned to walk away, the man looked at his hand, the one that held onto Jesus’, running his fingers over the palm as if he were feeling for something.

‘He was a big man, wasn’t he, Father? He sure had a big hammer, and he gave it to us, Father!’

Years later on a hill called Golgotha, Jesus saw that hammer again, and it was being used for a big job alright. After the soldier swung the last blow of the hammer, he looked at the man he was nailing to the cross. His eyes filled with horror as he recognized his face. He fell to his knees but quickly got back up before anyone would realize that his heart was being pierced. It seemed like forever as he looked into Jesus’ eyes, everything he’d ever done came up in his mind. He felt so helpless and he somehow knew why.
(photo from lynnmosher.blogspot.com)
Jesus said to him, so quietly that no one else heard, ‘Now, you know me. And yes, I’ve always known you, and I love you.’

It was no coincidence that his marriage was mended from the day he received that hammer.

It was no coincidence that his son was standing there beside him, also in a Roman soldier’s uniform.

He dropped the hammer and walked away from the cross, looking back only once. In his heart he grieved. But he knew that God knew of his grief when Jesus cried aloud from the cross in the air, ‘Father, forgive them. They know not what they do.’

He followed after the disciples – forgiven and alive for the first time in his life.

Have you yet to hold that hammer in your hand?


The house the King desires to live in is your heart. What have you let Him build there – with His hammer?